For Recreation Or Business You Can Rely On Free iPhone Apps

Smartphones and iPhones have made the lives of many professionals a lot easier. The iPhone applications are amazing and many give you the ability to run your business on the go. If your business requires that you travel, there is a iPhone app for that. You can also get apps that give you local phone directories no matter where you go. These are the general apps but there are many free iPhone applications and if you are diligent in your effort you can get many apps that duplicate the functionality of those more expensive apps.

For instance if you are an architect, you are out of the office a lot and apps that allow you to view AutoCAD files and interact with them. Some apps allow you to add voice, image, and video notes to your plans. Apps are no longer passive they are interactive and many connect to programs online or can be connected to your office servers.

Although iPhone apps only cost a few bucks at best it is easy to rack up hundreds of dollars in purchases if you are not careful. iTune billing makes it so easy to purchase apps that you can lose track of spending very easily. Until recently you had to download podcast through iTunes but with new free iPhone application you can bypass that process.

There are free iPhone applications that allow you to dictate text. Since so many people are texting and driving this app is timely and makes texting on the go a lot safer. You can use these apps free of charge; the life you save may be your own in this case.

The iPhone has hundreds if not thousands of apps and more are being developed all of the time. There are free iPhone apps for just about everything you can think of. Programmers and developers are constantly at the drawing board refining and redefining the applications that can be used via these smart phones.

The most popular apps are used for gaming, but that is just the tip of the iceberg. You can shop, watch movies and create music using free iPhone apps. When the telephone was invented, you can imagine that its ultimate use was never even imagined. Especially the free iPhone app that allows you to do video conferencing, imaging was not even conceived then. Take a look at the latest free iPhone application and choose a few that will help you at work and at play.

How Fast Should A Piece Of Music Be Played

The tempo of a piece of music is the speed at which it should be played and is an important part of playing music properly. Imagine if you played God Save the Queen for example at twice the speed for example, it just wouldn’t have the same solemnity and Happy Birthday at half speed wouldn’t be such a cheerful thing. Plus of course if you are playing in a group it is imperative that you all play at the same speed or it just sounds like a mess. The tempo is therefore decided upon by the composer and written on the music for musicians to follow.

Often this is indicated above the stave (the five lines upon which music is written) by a note followed by an equal sign and a number. This shows the number of notes in a minute. So if the note shown is a crotchet (a note a single beat long which can also be called a quarter note) then = 120, you know that the speed it should be played at is 120 single beats per minute or 2 a second. Or if it was a minim (a two beat note which can also be called a half note) then = 30 you know that there are 30 mimims to a minute, or 1 minim every 2 seconds.

However, sometimes tempo is not described in this way but by a written, usually single word, description. Occasionally this will be written in English, simply ‘fast’ for example but much more often it will be written in Italian. Some examples are given below.

Adagio – Slow

Allegro – Fast

Allegro non Troppo – not too fast

Andante – Walking tempo

Con Brio – with movement

Giocoso – Playful

Largo – Very slow

Lento – Slow

Moderato – Moderately

Presto – Very quick

You will also get add on words to these such as Molto – Very, Un Poco – a little. So Molto Lento means play very slowly.

Then there are words which describe a change to the tempo for example,

Rallantando – which means to gradually slow down and Ritard – which means immediately slow down to a slower speed and stay playing at that same slow speed. Also Accelerando which means gradually play faster.

Sometimes once the tempo has changed to a second different speed you might later get the indication Tempo Primo. This means go back to playing at the first tempo – speed – that you played at.

Dobro Lessons – Music Theory + Playing by Ear = Super Musician!

Here are 3 things I recommend you memorize.

1.    All the notes of the dobro or specific instrument
2.    All the Key Signatures
3.    All the Chords and Chord Tones for each key

Question: Why do this?

Answer: To gain a more complete understanding of your instrument, and to know where you are at all times and to know why what you are playing may sound good and why it may sound not so good.

Question: Is there an easier way? Can I get around not knowing any music theory and not knowing where any of the notes on my instrument are located?

Answer: I have found if you do not want to learn any music theory one can still play and in fact get quit good. Tons of great players have done it, and this is what I think ones options are if they want to get really good, but do not want to learn any music theory.

No Music Theory Option 1:

(I highly recommend doing this “In addition” to also understanding music theory)

To simply transcribe tons and tons and tons of songs, solos, rhythm playing, song forms, etc…so many that you can use the memory of those solos to dictate what you should play when you hear it in the context of a song. Your memory of all the songs and solos that you’ve learned and transcribed will trigger a muscle memory with your fingers and mind, and it will be like you are speaking with your instrument. Simply reacting to what you hear like you would if you were carrying on a conversation with someone. You will see all the patterns, and scales, and key signatures more as shapes that you equate to things that you’ve learned from solos, songs, and other musicians. You will have a working knowledge of the theory, but will not know why any of it works. You just know it does.

This is actually a great way of learning, and this way combined with an understanding of music theory can dramatically improve your playing and improvising in a much quicker way than just theory alone, or just transcribing alone.

Wtih theory you can take one thing that you transcribe and play it in other keys. Know how to change it around and play it over other chords. Basically multiplying everything that you already know.

No Music Theory Option 2:

(I do not recommend doing this)

The slowest way of improving….Not transcribing solos and simply to use trial and error or “noodling” around, fishing for the right note, not having a clue why anything you play sounds good or bad.

Getting Started:

The Keys:

The Sharp Keys:

C MAJOR – C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C

G MAJOR – G, A, B, C, D, E, F#, G

D MAJOR – D, E, F#, G, A, B, C#, D

A MAJOR – A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G#, A

E MAJOR – E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D#, E

B MAJOR – B, C#, D#, E, F#, G#, A#, B

F# MAJOR – F#, G#, A#, B, C#, D#, E#, F#

C# MAJOR – C#, D#, E#, F#, G#, A#, B#, C#

The Flat Keys

C MAJOR – C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C

F MAJOR – F, G, A, Bb, C, D, E, F

Bb MAJOR – Bb, C, D, Eb, F, G, A, Bb

Eb MAJOR – Eb, F, G, Ab, Bb, C, D, Eb

Ab MAJOR – Ab, Bb, C, Db, Eb, F, G, Ab

Db MAJOR – Db, Eb, F, Gb, Ab, Bb, C, Db

Gb MAJOR – Gb, Ab, Bb, Cb, Db, Eb, F, Gb

Cb MAJOR – Cb, Db, Eb, Fb, Gb, Ab, Bb, Cb

To Start Memorizing the Chords and Chord Tones Just Use these simple rules:

1) Chords are built in 3rds – Root, 3rd, 5th. Start with your root, skip a note, then you’ve got your third, skip a note, then you’ve got your fifth.

2) If you do that in a major key you end up with this pattern, harmonizing over each note of the scale: (examples are in the Key of G major)

1. = MAJOR ex. GBD
2. = minor ex. ACE
3. = minor ex. BDF#
4. = MAJOR ex. CEG
5. = MAJOR ex. DF#A
6. = minor ex. EGB
7. = diminished ex. F#AC

* NOTE:

To memorize anything quickly, simply use NOTE CARDS, and make out a set for your Key Signatures, a set for your Chords per Key, and a set for your chord tones per key.

Carry them around with you and when you are waiting in line or just don’t have anything to do. Pull them out and start memorizing them. In a month or so you will see dramatic improvements.