Benefits of Playing Classical Music to Your Baby and What Music to Play

Newborns react to music as well as aural simulation from when they are in the womb and all throughout their development; this is particularly effective until the age of roughly three. This is because during fetal development, it is the auditory system that is formed first, and the ear is the first sensory organ that develops a connection with brain. Due to these reasons, the infant’s ability to respond to music and sounds grows stronger.

What Songs to Play

A newborn baby is able to be acquainted with familiar songs and tunes and identify the voice of parents. Babies of up to one year however like sounds at which they can physically move to, as there is a strong connection between a baby’s hearing and motor ability.

Benefits of Classical Music

Classical music is also particularly effective when played to babies. It can have:

  • Benefits to language skills: According to senior child development researchers and researchers at the Chicago Children’s Museum, there is a powerful connection between musical ability and language development. Music heard by small babies can help them to develop language skills in more efficiently and at a more complex level. Listening to complex classical tunes can help them identify words with similar sounds such as ‘I’ and ‘Y’. Classical music helps babies to build up auditory memory and enhance the ability of the decoding auditory data.
  • Soothing down physical effects: Classical music can have great positive effect to the physical health of babies. It also makes their bodies and muscles become relaxed and well rested. Even the heart rate of babies responds positively to this situation. Therefore, slow yet soothing classical pieces of music can help these even the most fidgety of babies to relax, reduce physical pressure and get rid of their tensions, especially during bedtime.
  • Effects on mood: Listening to multiple types of classical music can help babies to lighten up their mood. Their body develops endorphins that are considered natural relaxants and are released from the brain. Development of such relaxants helps their bodies to reduce pain, promotes calmness and improves mood.
  • Diminishing birth trauma: The entire process of being born to a completely new world can be both stressful and frightening for newbie. According to famous doctors, soothing classical music can help newborns to get out of this trauma easily when they are first born and in the following weeks. When babies are in utero, they are able to listen to their mother’s heartbeat. This sound is familiar as well as comforting for them both during and after birth, replicating this with a slow piece of music helps the effect to continue.

Besides these vital benefits, babies have a natural tendency to respond positively to music. It is also very entertaining for them as well. Whether you want your child to be the next Einstein, or just to get a good night’s sleep, play music, let them enjoy, dance, move and even parents will find themselves starting to experience the benefits.

The Quickest Way to Learn Music, Keyboard Playing and More

There is so much you can learn as an adult. Make no mistake, the quickest way to learn music, keyboard playing or alike is to have a great instructor. The surprise to some is that the instructor can be online and the results are even better. Long story short, you can learn everything you want and have always wanted to learn by finding a program that teaches you the most effective way possible. After years of music lessons I can tell you that in person classes are not the most effective or most productive. You can do much more and PianoForAll can help you if you are interested in learning at home.

You are going to practice and play at home, so it makes sense to learn music, keyboard playing and other skill sets at home. I rave about PianoForAll because of the order in which people are taught. You don’t learn one note at a time and then a week later put three of them together. Instead you work book by book, they are interactive to make it even better, and each book has a theme or focus.

The first book and the first lesson allow you to make melodies that people will recognize and mistake for years of experience as opposed to a few hours of practice. You don’t have to take my word for it and you probably won’t but you can take the word of many others before you who will gladly attest, individually, that this method is the best. Don’t delay any longer; how long have you been wanting to do this? I have a feeling you came here hoping there was a way you could learn music, keyboard playing or piano playing rather, and be able to do it online. Now that you know it’s possible, all you have to do is follow through, so do not stop now.

Can Musical Tones Played in the Ear Help With Gait-Freezing in Parkinson’s Patients?

Parkinson’s Disease is the second most common degenerative neurological disorder. The incidence of Parkinson’s Disease, let’s called it PD for short, is growing rapidly with an aging population. The fundamental cause of PD is the death of nerve cells that produce a chemical called dopamine. The loss of these dopamine producing cells occurs in a part of the brain known generally as the basal ganglia and specifically the substantia nigra.

This part of the brain, the basal ganglia, is known to influence movement and diseases or injury of the basal ganglia produces what are known collectively as movement disorders which include Parkinson’s Disease. Parkinson’s Disease is characterized by slow movements known as bradykinesia (brady = slow, kinesis = movements), tremor and other signs of abnormal muscle function. One of the more disturbing symptoms that can occur in patients suffering with PD is called freezing of gait.

Voluntary movement takes place in two basic steps. To move we create the intention to move in one part of the brain. Thus one part of the brain plans the movement and the actual movement commands that activate the muscles occur in a different part of the brain. So we plan a movement and that plan is carried out by other circuits in the brain which then execute that plan.

In many patients with Parkinson’s Disease, planned movements like walking have delayed or failed execution. This is called Freezing-of-gait and it can severely diminish the quality of life in a Parkinson’s patient. Although we call this symptom freezing of gait, it can actually occur with any voluntary movement, like reaching for a glass, brushing your hair or getting up from a seated position to stand. It often leaves the Parkinson’s patient unable to initiate a movement or stuck in the middle of a planned action. It should not be hard for you to imagine how freezing might severely diminish a patient’s functional abilities and interfere with his or her daily activities.

Not surprisingly, freezing has also been linked to falls and injuries in PD patients.

The medical treatments for PD include drugs that replace the dopamine that is lost with degeneration of the substantia nigra. As a general rule dopamine replacement therapies are quite effective for patients suffering with PD with two notable exceptions:

  1. They usually are not particularly effective for freezing-type symptoms and
  2. They usually loose their effectiveness over time

A number of research groups believe they have identified the specific part of the brain which malfunctions and causes freezing symptoms in Parkinson’s patients. It is known as the pedunculopontine nucleus (let’s call it the PPN for short) in the brainstem. This has lead to a number of trials of electrical stimulation of the PPN through the use of surgically implanted deep brain electrodes. There are a growing number of reports that suggest that electrical stimulation of the PPN may produce promising results for patients in the advanced stages of Parkinson’s Disease. This technique appears to activate the PPN and results in reduced gait-freezing in patients suffering from Parkinson’s Disease. While this is a promising surgical procedure, it does however, require brain surgery and all of the associated risks.

If only there was a way to stimulate the PPN in the brainstem non-invasively.

Some recent research suggests that non-surgical PPN stimulation may now be possible. What is even more encouraging is the possibility of stimulating the PNN and reducing freezing through the use of musical tones played through special bone conducting headphones. Let’s see how this might work.

Research has shown that structures in the inner ear called otoliths can be stimulated by tones of highly specific frequencies. These inner ear structures have direct connections with the PPN which as we have discussed are important brainstem structures related to freezing symptoms in Parkinson’s Disease. Stimulating the otoliths with a tone played through special bone-conducting headphones may activate the PPN and has the potential to reduce gait-freezing in patients suffering from Parkinson’s Disease. Other research suggests that neurological rehabilitation and cueing patients with auditory or visual signals can improve freezing symptoms in PD patients. Thus there is the potential to improve freezing of gait through the combination of rehabilitation with auditory cueing using sound frequencies known to stimulate the PPN which is implicated in freezing of gait in PD.

This is very encouraging news for patients suffering from gait freezing associated with Parkinson’s Disease.